Delicious Morsels From Nova Scotia…Taking the Memories Home

Posted by on Sep 22, 2013 in Canada, Destinations, Food, Foodie Tuesday | 11 comments

Whenever I travel I try to bring home local food products that I’ve sampled and liked (usually loved). A few, I haven’t actually sampled, but they look interesting and someone else had raved about how good they were. Some will be given away to family and friends, and some will be devoured before ever leaving my kitchen. One of my favorite places for procuring tasty morsels is in my own home province of Nova Scotia. I brought back a particularly good “haul” this past summer, and I want to share my savory goodies  with you in this post. With the exception of the cheese, everything was under $10.00 Canadian.

WARNING…I take no responsibility for the hunger pangs this post might give you dear reader.

 

Here’s a selection of what I purchased and brought back to Korea. Notice…maple syrup, blueberry syrup, apple butter, maple balsamic dressing, lavender pepper,  “ketchup”, and cheese. All of this deliciousness is produced right in Nova Scotia! The only thing that stopped me from purchasing more was the airlines weight restrictions!

 

Morsels From Nova Scotia

 

The Lavender Pepper is produced by Sledding Hill Growers, in Bear River, Nova Scotia, often called the Switzerland of Nova Scotia. I purchased this from Maples , a quaint little shop on the Halifax water front at Bishop’s Landing The owner, Arline Vincent, highly recommended this gourmet delight be sprinkled on fresh Atlantic salmon.

 

Sledding Hill, Bear River, NS

Sledding Hill, Bear River, NS

Another fab find at Maples was this Balsamic Maple Dressing; out of this world delicious. I have been using it on salads, and baked potatoes. How good is it? Well, I want to lick the plate after I finish my baked potatoes. Produced and bottled in Nova Scotia by Juliette and John , I am so hoping that they will ship to Korea when I run out of this deliciousness! I love the bottle, and it is even corked. I wouldn’t think twice about giving this as a gift! Getting a good photo of this was a bit of a challenge. Do check out the website for some great photos of all the gourmet dressings they have on offer.

Balsamic Maple Dressing

My final purchase from Maples (and believe me, I could have purchased one of EVERYTHING!) was this Fire Roasted Red Pepper Ketchup. Made with roasted peppers, it’s sweet, and tangy, with a bit of fire. Recommended to accompany anything barbecued, and it is fantastically good! This was the only item I purchased that is not produced in Nova Scotia, but it is made in Canada.

www.roothamsgourmet.com

www.roothamsgourmet.com

The Cheese…living in a cheese deprived nation, makes me run to the deli section of any Nova Scotia grocery store. Pete’s Frootique has one of the best cheese displays in the city. Technically, I don’t think I am “allowed” to bring diary products into Korea, but when it comes to cheese I live dangerously. Space was very limited this time around, so that meant I had to be a little bit frugal with the cheese purchases……..SOB! I finally decided on one that I had bought on my trip home in 2011, and could still taste it’s bitey deliciousness in my head 2 years later!

Let me introduce you to DRAGON’S BREATH BLUE…”a surfaced ripened soft cheese” Little brother to the Great Stilton, Gorgonzola, and Roquefort.Just slice off the top and dig in.” Produced in Upper Economy, Nova Scotia at That Dutchman’s Farm, learn all about this amazing little cheese, with a quick click.

 

http://www.denhoek.ca/pages/DragonsBreathBlue.aspx#sthash.P8gbzhlQ.dpuf

http://www.denhoek.ca/pages/DragonsBreathBlue.aspx#sthash.P8gbzhlQ.dpuf

 

PS…I try to eat this cheese with a nice French baguette, but honestly, it is just so GOOD that it usually finds my mouth before the bread ! 🙂

We all know that Canada has a lot of maple trees, eh? Of course that means maple syrup. Nova Scotia produces its share of this syrupy goodness. Packaged in bottles of all shapes and sizes, its easy to find one or two that will fit in your bulging suitcase.

 

Maple Syrup

Maple syrup is available in all the souvenir shops, but I highly recommend that you go to the local grocery store to purchase. You can easily find it at either Sobeys or Atlantic Superstore. There are two reasons: first, it is much cheaper, and secondly, you will have more sizes to choose from. The big bottle in this photo was on sale at 40% off, and well under ten bucks!

I use maple syrup as a substitute for regular sugar. Try it on french toast, or add it to a homemade salad dressing…YUM.

Nova Scotia is also well known for its blueberries. We even have a town “Oxford”, which markets itself as the “Blueberry Capital of the World”. When I was a kid I would go picking with my Dad along the highway not far from where we lived. These days, it’s harder to find wild berries, but they do exist. Blueberry syrup now stands proudly with the maple syrup. Again, but it in the grocery store; cheaper and more sizes available. You can even purchase cute little bottles with the tops wrapped in Nova Scotia tartan! Acadian Maple Products (and blueberry too!)

 

http://www.acadianmaple.com

http://www.acadianmaple.com

Like the maple syrup, this is delish on french toast, and of course pancakes, and when you’re making your own out of this world salad dressing!!

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I hope I have made you hungry to not only eat and enjoy local Nova Scotia products, but to increase your “hunger” to come visit Nova Scotia, a little piece of paradise.

Which product most intrigues you to try? Do you buy local food to take back home?

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Other Nova Scotia posts that I have published recently…

Charmed by the Biscuit Eater in Mahone Bay

Postcard Perfect Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia

French Fries Worth the Journey

Blue is for Blue Rocks, Nova Scotia

 Turanor PlanetSolar Graces the Halifax Harbor

Nova Scotia Coastal Moments

A Nova Scotia Icon

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This is my contribution to #FoodieTuesday, hosted by Inside Journeys.


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11 Comments

  1. mmm…yum! I’ve tried all these (not the same brands though), except for the Lavender Pepper and absolutely loved it all. Now I miss them so you can’t just get away by saying you’re not responsible for any hunger pangs 🙂

  2. haha Salika…just think, now you can dream of trying the all again in Nova Scotia 🙂

  3. Nancie, I can see why you’d be stocking up. Who could resist these delicious morsels?
    I’m ready to try the Lavender Pepper (you had Lavender salt in the first highlighted para) and the Fire Roasted Red Pepper Ketchup. The syrups sound great as well. Hope you can get a goodie bag sent over when your haul runs out!
    Thanks for linking up this week, Nancie, and introducing me to these goodies! Will see if I find them in Toronto when I go.

    • Hi Marcia, I would be surprised if you couldn’t get most of these items in Toronto. Enjoy your trip!

  4. Wow, that’s a great collection of local finds, I would love to try some of the Lavender pepper, sounds excellent

    • Hi Noel, I sprinkled this on a salad the other night, and it was excellent!

  5. We wanted to send a host family a gift, when our daughter went to live with them. We sent along a bottle of maple syrup and they served it to everyone in shot glasses like an after dinner drink.

    We still laugh about this, especially about how our daughter had to choke down so much pure sugar in a gulp.

    • Hi Neva, OH MY! That would definitely be a new sugar high!

  6. Nancie, I’m a cheese “addict” and I would love to try some of that Dragon’s Breath Blue! I’ve never heard of it. That syrup looks yummy… 🙂

    • Hi Mike! That cheese is out of this world delicious. It’s been around for a few years. They won some big cheese contest with it a number of years ago. Try their site, maybe the ship 🙂

  7. This post is making me seriously hungry. Lavender pepper sounds intriguing, and the blueberry syrup sounds luscious, but it’s the Balsamic Maple Dressing that has my mouth watering. I’d be licking my plate, too, so I wouldn’t waste a drop.

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