Halifax

Nova Scotia: Halifax Photo Essay

Posted by on Mar 31, 2016 in Canada, Destinations, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Travel Photo Thursday | 28 comments

Welcome to week 271 (3/31/2016) of Travel Photo Thursday. Halifax,Nova Scotia and home is on my mind tonight. I’m deep into the new semester, and that really will be my focus until the third week in June. This is also the time of year when I get a little homesick for Halifax. Even though we often have springs that are wet and cold, I  love them. Spring is just that time of the year when everything comes alive, and there is nothing prettier than springtime in my city. Today, I’m taking you on a little photo journey of the place I will always call home. Some of these photos have been posted before, and I think I managed to scare up a couple from my archives. Enjoy!

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

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Halifax is famous for its ice free scenic harbour. For the best views, take a ride on the Halifax-Dartmouth ferry. When I was a kid it cost a nickel, now you’re probably looking at 3 bucks. Go up top, for the best views.

 

Halifax Harbour from Pier 21

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Travel Photo Thursday: 2015 in Review

Posted by on Dec 24, 2015 in Chiang Mai, Destinations, Food, Halifax, Korea, Korea, Travel Photo Thursday | 8 comments

Welcome to week 260 (12/24/2015) of Travel Photo Thursday and our Christmas Eve edition! Wherever you are, and whatever traditions you celebrate, the best of the season! In just a few short hours I begin my journey to Barcelona, where I will land 9:35 am on Christmas morning. I’m sure you’ll all know how excited I am. This is the first major travel I’ve done since last winter, so I feel long over due for an adventure. This week I am publishing a short Travel Photo Thursday 2015 round-up. The seven posts below were the most commented on in 2015. Please enjoy!

We’re pretty easy going here at BTS, but please remember to follow a few guidelines…

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

Return here and place your link in the Mr. Linky at the bottom of this post.

Please post a link to a post featuring a travel photo, not simply a link to your blog.

The Twitter hashtag for Travel Photo Thursday is #TPThursday.

Only one link per blog. 

As a courtesy, please post a link to Budget Travelers Sandbox.

Finally, please leave a comment, and I do hope you’ll take the time to visit a few of the other great folk who linked up this week. 

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In number six spot,  with 42 comments each, we have two posts.

Remember the opium in Chiang Mai?

Chiang Mai: Opium at Doi Pui, Thailand for Travel Photo Thursday

 

Opium Poppy

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A 1749 Halifax Landmark for Travel Photo Thursday

Posted by on Dec 4, 2014 in Canada, Destinations, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Travel Photo Thursday | 17 comments

Walk to the corner of Spring Garden Road and Barrington Street, and it’s safe to that you are in one of the most historical parts of Halifax. On your right is the Old Burial Ground, and directly across the street you have St. Matthew’s United Church founded in the same year as Halifax, 1749, and the oldest United Church in Canada. That’s where I am taking you today, on week 204 (December 4, 2014) of Travel Photo Thursday.

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

Return here and place your link in the Mr. Linky at the bottom of this post.

Please post a link to a post featuring a travel photo, not simply a link to your blog.

The Twitter hashtag for Travel Photo Thursday is #TPThursday.

As a courtesy, please post a link to Budget Travelers Sandbox.

 

The church that stands today, an outstanding example of Gothic Revival architecture, is not the original, which burnt to the ground on January 1st, 1857.

 

St. Matthew's United Church, Halifax, Nova Scotia

St. Matthew's Church, Halifax, Nova Scotia

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Halifax’s Titanic Connection for Travel Photo Thursday

Posted by on Apr 3, 2014 in Canada, Destinations, Featured, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Travel Photo Thursday | 54 comments

This week I’m taking you back to Nova Scotia, and to Halifax’s Titanic connection. Welcome to our 171st week of Travel Photo Thursday. Spring has arrived in Korea, and my plan is to get out and get some cherry blossom and magnolia shots before they are all but a beautiful memory. This a far cry from Halifax, where my poor Dad is still suffering through an unusually cold and nasty winter.

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

Return here and place your link in the Mr. Linky at the bottom of this post.

Please post a link to a post featuring a travel photo, not simply a link to your blog.

The Twitter hashtag for Travel Photo Thursday is #TPThursday.

As a courtesy, please post a link to Budget Travelers Sandbox.

Halifax’s role in the aftermath of the sinking of the Titanic is a sad one. Three ships from the city were involved in the grim task of recovering victims from the cold, bleak North Atlantic. Over 100 of the bodies plucked from the sea found their way to Halifax, and buried in three of the city’s cemeteries. Fairview Lawn Cemetary is the final resting place for one hundred and twenty-one of the Titanic’s casualties; more than any other cemetery in the world.

 

Titantic Grave Site, Fairview Lawn Cemetary

 

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Travel Photo Thursday — Mar.6/14– Halifax’s Old Burial Ground

Posted by on Mar 6, 2014 in Canada, Destinations, Featured, Halifax, Travel Photo Thursday | 51 comments

Welcome to another week of Travel Photo Thursday (our 167th). I’m back to classes this week, and with 200+ students, it’s going to be a busy semester. Plus, we seem to have gone back into the deep freeze this week; windy and cold! Last week we visited St. Paul’s Church in Halifax. In case you missed the post, take the peek! 🙂 This week we’re ambling south a few  blocks to Halifax’s Old Burial Ground.

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

Return here and place your link in the Mr. Linky at the bottom of this post.

Please post a link to a post featuring a travel photo, not simply a link to your blog.

The Twitter hash tag for Travel Photo Thursday is #TPThursday.

As a courtesy please post a link to Budget Travelers Sandbox.

Halifax's Old Burial Ground. At one time it was St. Paul's Cemetary

Halifax’s Old Burial Ground. At one time it was St. Paul’s Cemetary

 

Founded in 1749,  the cemetery was originally non-denominational, and the only cemetery in the city. In 1793, St. Paul’s (Anglican) Church took it over, and it remained open to burials until 1844. Some 12,000 people are buried here. Today, only 1,200 headstones and crypts remain. Some headstones have disappeared (disturbing!), and  it was not uncommon to be buried without a headstone. Also, some of  the graves contain more than one body. I found numerous headstones inscribed with more than one name; many of them being children.

The Old Burial Ground is dominated by the Welsford-Parker Monument. The arch  is the second oldest war monument in Canada, and was built to commemorate the Brits victory in the Crimean War (the only one in North America). It is named after two Haligonians, Major Welsford and Captain Parker, who died while fighting in the Crimean War.

Only monument in North America commemorating the Crimean War.

Only monument in North America commemorating the Crimean War.

 

The oldest headstone dates back to 1752. The day I visited there was no one on duty, and I was unable to find that stone. However, I did find this one dated 1792. I am amazed at how well the engraving has survived!

1792

1792

 

If you think you have a long lost relative buried here, you just might find them!

You might just find a long lost relative!

You might just find a long lost relative!

 

A prominent citizen of the city…

Erasmus James Phillips

Headstones from the early 1800s.

Old Burial Ground, 1800s

Old Burial Ground, 1800s

 

m_More Headstones1800-1551

Crypts at the Old Burial Ground

Crypts at the Old Burial Ground

The final resting place of Major General Robert Ross, who died in a battle where American troops were defeated…(War of 1812-14)

Died on Sept. 12, 1814 in a battle near Baltimore.

Died on Sept. 12, 1814 in a battle near Baltimore.

 

You can read all about the Major General...

You can read all about the Major General…

 

 

The Old Burial Ground remembers the war of 1812-1814…

Here's the answer!

Here’s the answer!

From the Old Burial Ground website…

“On June 1, 1813, USS Chesapeake, Captain James Lawrence, sailed out of Boston harbour to attack HMS Shannon, Captain Philip Broke. Certain of another British defeat, Bostonians anticipating the evening’s victory banquet came out to sea to enjoy the fight. They were shocked to see that only fifteen minutes after the battle began, Chesapeake’s ensign dropped. Up rose the Blue Ensign; below it, the Stars and Stripes appeared. His captain, severely wounded, his first lieutenant killed, it fell to 22 year old Halifax born Provo Wallis, Shannon’s second lieutenant, to command his ship. The third lieutenant, Charles Falkiner, took charge of the Chesapeake, giving special care to Lawrence, who lay in his wardroom, mortally wounded. The two frigates sailed eastward into the gathering darkness as the disappointed sightseers returned to Boston to report the unbelievable news. Chesapeake taken!”

I think it’s amazing that a 22 year old Haligonian saved us from becoming another star on the American flag!

Halifax’s Old Burial Ground is a National Historic site, and the Old Burial Ground Foundation maintains an excellent website….click here. 

Travelers Tip

Location and Hours

Open daily from sunrise to sunset; free to enter

 

Corner of Spring Garden Road and Barrington St.

Corner of Spring Garden Road and Barrington St.

 

What are your thoughts on visiting graveyards when you travel? Yay or Nay?

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This is the 167th edition of Travel Photo Thursday. You can browse the archives here.

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Halifax: The Unexplained Silhouette

Posted by on Feb 27, 2014 in Canada, Destinations, Featured, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Travel Photo Thursday | 33 comments

Halifax: The Unexplained Silhouette…

Welcome to another week of Travel Photo Thursday (our 166th). This week I’m taking a break from Chiang Mai and Thailand, and heading home to Halifax. I want to show you Halifax’s oldest building and the oldest Protestant church in Canada.

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

Return here and place your link in the Mr. Linky at the bottom of this post.

Please post a link to a post featuring a travel photo, not simply a link to your blog.

The Twitter hash tag for Travel Photo Thursday is #TPThursday.

As a courtesy please post a link to Budget Travelers Sandbox.

 

That would be Saint Paul’s Anglican Church, opening its doors on September 2, 1750. Many of the church’s parishioners are credited with being instrumental in the founding of Halifax, the province, and even Canada. St. Paul’s is often referred to as the “Westminister Abbey of Canada” because of its many stained glass windows, and memorials. One memorial tablet records the church as having the first Sunday school in Canada; 1783.

Located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, St. Paul's is the oldest Protestant church in Canada.

Located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, St. Paul’s is the oldest Protestant church in Canada.

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